RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Complete List

Posted by rtmsf on June 23rd, 2011

We’ve said it many times, but it bears repeating here.  NBA Draft day represents a great deal of bittersweetness around the RTC compound.  On one hand, we want nothing but the best for every single one of the kids we’ve enjoyed watching over the last few years on campuses around the country.  For most of these guys, tonight is the single greatest moment of their lives, and represents a crowning achievement they’ve dreamed of for many hours, days, weeks, and years.  On the other hand, like caretakers at the end of the annual summer camp, we’re sad to see the next crop leave us.  When we think back to specific instances, such as when we interviewed an uncertain and unknown yet clearly talented Arizona power forward as a freshman two Januarys ago; or, when we watched a likable yet overlooked Providence senior drop 52 against Notre Dame last February; or, when we started crushing on the jumpshot of a funny-named guy from BYU back in 2009; or, when we shook our heads in wonder and amazement that the same player who looked so lost for Jim Calhoun in 2010 became the best player in America (and a national champion) in 2011.  We nod our heads to honor and say goodbye to every one of these guys, and we certainly hope that they’ll take advantage of the tremendous opportunity that they’ll be afforded in just a few short hours.  Godspeed, fellas.

The Jimmer Jumper Will Be Missed

Over the last six weeks, we put together a draft profile of the 35 collegians who we feel have the best chance of a first round selection tonight.  Since we focus exclusively on college basketball around here, we believe we bring a slightly different perspective to these things.  Although we take time to project out each player’s skill set for the significantly different NBA game, we also have the experience of watching these players very closely as collegians (rather than as future pros) to discuss their strengths and weaknesses.  Each player we did a profile for is listed below, in alphabetical order by last name.

* RTC correspondents Andrew Murawa, Kevin Doyle, Zach Hayes and Brian Goodman contributed to these draft profiles.  Additional thanks to Chris Denker of NetScouts Basketball for his scouting breakdowns of each player profiled.

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Brandon Knight

Posted by rtmsf on June 22nd, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Brandon Knight

School: Kentucky

Height/Weight: 6’4/180 lbs.

NBA Position: Point Guard

Projected Draft Range: High Lottery

Overview: It may have only been a single-season college career, but what a season for Brandon Knight. By leading his team in scoring (17.3 PPG), assists (4.2 APG), minutes (35.9 MPG), and late-game NCAA Tournament heroics (just ask Princeton, West Virginia and Ohio State), Knight did something nobody thought he could ever do when the 2010-11 season started: erase the collective longing of the Big Blue Nation for John Wall to have stayed for his sophomore year. The comparisons stopped just a few games into the season, and for good reason — the two are (gasp) quite different players, which most observers deduced early. But for all the strengths Wall had as a collegian, one of the areas where Knight was more effective than his predecessor was perimeter shooting. It might be called the Dribble Drive, but John Calipari’s system works best when the point guard can shoot. Knight’s ability to keep defenders honest and drain outside shots may be one of the biggest reasons he has something else John Wall doesn’t: a trip to the Final Four.

With Improved Decision-Making, Knight Has All-Star Potential

Will Translate to the NBA: There’s no need to save Brandon a seat in the green room on draft night. He might as well just stand, since won’t be there very long. Even with such a diverse skill set, there are three things (above all others) that his new employers will love. First, he’s got a sweet first step that he uses when defenders get a little too honest. Second, he’s got that great combination of intelligence and coachability that instructors at the next level salivate over. Finally, he’s 19. Brandon Knight is already a top-flight prospect and he’s not even close to realizing his full potential. This is all on top of the aforementioned reliable outside jumper, a genuine concern for his own defensive prowess that belies his age, and a love for stepping up and making big plays at big moments.
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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Kyrie Irving

Posted by nvr1983 on June 22nd, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Kyrie Irving

School: Duke

Height/Weight: 6’3/190 lbs.

NBA Position: Point Guard

Projected Draft Range: #1 Overall

Overview: Irving opened his career at Duke playing about as well as anybody could have expected a freshman point guard to play so early in his career even considering the ideal situation he joined (playing on a defending national champion with two of its top players — Kyle Singler and Nolan Smith — returning). Irving was playing so well that by the time Duke’s national championship game rematch against Butler rolled around on December 4 he had established himself as the top player on a loaded team and the runaway choice as national player of the year. Then Irving injured his toe and appeared lost for the season but made a return in the NCAA Tournament where he was solid, but clearly not playing like he had before the injury (excepting one half against Arizona in the Sweet Sixteen). Despite his abbreviated season, Irving showed more than enough to NBA scouts and executives to make him the clear-cut #1 choice to the Cleveland Cavaliers in this year’s NBA Draft. Although his lack of world-class athleticism makes many observers question whether he will ever become a true star in the NBA, there is little doubt he will be a solid player based on his already well-developed all-court game as he appears to have no real weakness in terms of his skill set.

Irving is the clear #1 pick in this year's NBA Draft

Will Translate to the NBA: A point guard that everybody on his team will love playing with. One of the most interesting aspects of Irving’s single season at Duke was not his impressive early-season performances, but instead it was his ability to take command of a senior-laden team without any evidence of a fracture in team chemistry. The freshman guard will be a good starting point guard in the NBA for years and his ability to hit from outside and penetrate will make him a coach’s dream. The big question with Irving from an NBA standpoint is what his ceiling is. Ten years ago this probably would not have been an issue, but with the recent point guard renaissance and the appearance of ridiculously athletic point guards like Derrick Rose and Russell Westbrook in the NBA, it becomes a significant issue for a #1 overall pick. Kyrie will probably never contend for an MVP award and might not even make many All-Star teams, but he is one of the most complete point guards you will find coming out of college and maybe the most complete freshman point guard in years.

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Kenneth Faried

Posted by jstevrtc on June 21st, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Kenneth Faried

School: Morehead State

Height/Weight: 6’8/228 lbs.

NBA Position: Power Forward

Projected Draft Range: Late First Round

Overview: We certainly hope you’ve heard by now… Kenneth Faried is the all-time leading rebounder in college basketball history. He might have played at a little school in a relatively little conference, but don’t let that fool you into thinking this fellow displays less than anything but a rapacious attack on the boards at all times. The only year of his four-year career as an Eagle in which he didn’t lead the OVC in rebounding was his freshman season. In 2007-08, Faried averaged — heh heh — a mere 8.0 RPG (it would eventually become 13.0, 13.0, and 14.5 over the next three seasons) and finished third in the conference. He must have been slacking.

It's Hard To Pass Up (Or Root Against) a Player With a Specific Skill

Will Translate to the NBA: Besides the rebounding, Faried showed a penchant for blocking shots, which should not surprise anyone since both of those skills are based on timing and vertical speed. He led the OVC in blocks in his senior season and finished in the top three in the conference in that statistic in his sophomore through senior years. Faried has a rock-solid physique that helped him body up to anyone defensively that he faced in college, but that outstanding hand speed also helped him finish in the top three in steals in the OVC in each of this last three seasons. His dedication to excelling on the defensive side plus his commitment to glass-cleaning are traits that have several coaches rubbing their hands in anticipation.

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Tristan Thompson

Posted by rtmsf on June 21st, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Tristan Thompson

School: Texas

Height/Weight: 6’8/230 lbs.

NBA Position: Power Forward

Projected Draft Range: Mid-First Round

Overview:  The dreaded “tweener” label.  Given to players who have the size for one position but whose game is better suited for another position, Tristan Thompson appears to be one of these guys.  The Canadian import has a lot of things going for him — his explosiveness, lateral quickness, length and energy around the basket are tools that make him an intriguing prospect for a number of NBA squads in the low lottery picks.  But his small forward size and a complete inability to shoot the ball with a semblance of a post move or facing up with any kind of consistency is a serious problem.  Already 20 years old, Thompson has a significant learning curve ahead of him in terms of finding scoring opportunities apart from what is inarguably a great motor — the mechanics on his shot are poor, as evidenced by his 48.7% performance last year at the free throw line, and the athleticism advantage he enjoyed in Austin will be marginalized by equally strong athletes at the NBA level.  His calling card in the League might eventually come at the defensive end, what with his seven-foot-plus wingspan, strong physical base and above-average lateral quickness.  His bounce off the floor and anticipatory skills led Thompson to lead the Big 12 in blocks last year with 2.4 per game, and his containment of Arizona’s Derrick Williams (4-14 FG) in the NCAA Tournament showed that he can defend elite scorers.  Based on his athleticism and effort, Thompson is certain to be picked in the top half of the first round, but the team that gets him is buying a mixed bag of future possibilities with this player, from future All-Star to out of the league in three years.

Thompson Has Tweener Written All Over Him

Will Translate to the NBA:  His body and athleticism translate well to the NBA, although he’s not exceptionally built compared to the level of athlete he’ll find there.  His energy and effort, though, are areas where he may be able to separate himself.  Motivation and desire are intangibles that are an underrated aspect of this game, but Thompson may be able to make up for several of his shortcomings through sheer will.  As mentioned above, Thompson could also become an exceptional defender, one capable of guarding both power and small forwards if he eventually chooses to focus on becoming an elite player in that regard.  

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Alec Burks

Posted by rtmsf on June 20th, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Alec Burks

School: Colorado

Height/Weight: 6’6/195 lbs.

NBA Position: Shooting Guard

Projected Draft Range: Mid-First Round

Overview:  Alec Burks is as prolific a scorer on the wing as you’ll find in the 2011 draft class.  In just two seasons at Colorado, he scored nearly 1,300 points, averaging 19.0 PPG and leading the Big 12 in scoring last year.  He hit for 20+ points in 24 games last season, coming up big when it mattered most, contributing 29, 24, and 23 in the Big 12 Tournament, and 27, 25, 25, and 20 in four games in the NIT.  He has a prototypical NBA shooting guard’s body, standing at a lean 6’6 with long arms and an adequate , if not explosive, jumping ability.  He can score in a variety of ways, but his most proficient skill is his pronounced ability to slash to the basket and convert difficult shots in traffic.  Scorers like him have a knack for finding seams where lesser talented players do not, and Burks is exceptional in this regard.  His jumper is still a work in progress (29% from three last season), although scouts have noted that his misses both from length and the mid-range are perhaps more because of inconsistency in his fundamentals (fading, leaning, failure to sufficiently square his body) rather than an inability to make those shots.  In other words, they believe that this problem is fixable through proper coaching and repetition.  If this is indeed the case, we expect Burks to make a significant impact on the NBA within three to five years as he works into his frame and builds a complete offensive arsenal to complement his already-prodigious slashing talents.

Alec Burks Has Tremendous NBA Upside

Will Translate to the NBA:  His ability to score is what will translate to the NBA immediately.  Scorers are born, not made, and Burks has an uncanny knack for finding ways to put the ball in the basket even when there’s no good shot available.  This skill will endear him to coaches at the next level always looking for quick, easy buckets from players coming off the bench.  Even if no other part of Burks’ game ever develops, he should be able to survive a number of years on this ability alone.    

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Derrick Williams

Posted by rtmsf on June 18th, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Derrick Williams

School: Arizona

Height/Weight6’8, 248 lbs.

NBA Position: Small/Power Forward

Projected Draft Range: High Lottery

Overview:  Two years ago, Derrick Williams signed on with Sean Miller and Arizona after having been released from his letter of intent with USC following the firing of Tim Floyd. Williams was, at that time, the #72-rated incoming recruit (according to ESPNU) and there were few expectations for immediate production. However, Williams made a splash early and often in Tucson, winning the Pac-10 Freshman of the Year award while averaging 15 points and seven rebounds in a highly efficient manner. He stepped up his game big time in his second season, averaging 19.5 points and 8.3 rebounds while adding an absurdly accurate three-point shot (he made 42 of his 74 attempts for a whopping 56.8% from deep) and turning into the Wildcats’ unquestioned go-to guy. His play in the NCAA Tournament may have even been a bit better, as he almost single-handedly kept Arizona in the game against Duke, scoring 25 of his 32 points in the first half and making sure his name was known far and wide on the national stage. Williams mostly played the four at Arizona, but his quick first-step, explosive leaping ability and deadly accuracy from deep qualify him as a potential NBA three. But his measurements at the NBA combine (a 7’1 wingspan and a 9’0 standing reach) paired with his powerful body confirm that he can also hang physically with power forwards at the next level. And, his ability to step away from the basket and provide offense away from the grind of the lane make him a highly desirable asset. While it remains expected that Kyrie Irving will be the top pick in the draft, Williams looks like a lock to be the second pick, although it remains to be seen whether Minnesota will hold onto that pick or if another team, possibly Cleveland dangling it’s #4 pick as trade bait, moves up to claim him.

Derrick Williams Showed Off His Inner Beast in March

Will Translate to the NBA:  Williams’ offensive game is pretty well polished. Aside from the magical appearance of a deadly three-point shot that wasn’t even hinted at in his first season, Williams has a killer first step, solid handles and major finishing ability at the rim. He’s displayed solid post moves, he’s terrific at drawing fouls and getting to the line, and he’s also shown a great nose for the ball and an ability to score off broken plays or putbacks. Throw in the fact that his basketball IQ is off the charts (he rarely forces a bad shot, but remains aggressive enough to make the most of his skills) and Williams can score in the NBA from his first minutes.

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Marcus Morris

Posted by nvr1983 on June 17th, 2011

Player NameMarcus Morris

School: Kansas

Height/Weight: 6’9/230 lbs.

NBA Position: Power Forward

Projected Draft Range: Mid- to Late Lottery

Overview: On a roster full of potential first round draft picks, Marcus Morris established himself as the team’s top player. Although the team did not live up to expectations as it fell in the Elite 8 to a hot VCU team, anybody following Marcus had to consider this year a major step for him individually as he was named Big 12 Player of the Year and 2nd team All-American while averaging 17.2 PPG on 57% FG and 7.6 RPG. In doing so, he exhibited an ability to not only play inside, but also an ability shoot from outside. Although he will never be a major threat from the perimeter (and he is not as good of a shooter as his twin brother Markieff–34.2% versus 42.4%) his shooting has progressed to the point where a NBA team would have to at least respect his outside shot and bring a forward outside to put a hand in his face. The big question for Marcus will be whether he is big enough to battle inside with NBA power forwards or if he will fall into the dreaded “tweener” category. If he does fall into that group he may lack the perimeter skills necessary to compete against NBA small forwards, but he may be able to make up for it because of his “motor” and willingness to battle all over the court.

Marcus has the skills to play in the NBA, but can he battle inside?

Will Translate to the NBA: Marcus will probably end up being one of those versatile all-court power forwards in the NBA, which traditionally has been a warning sign for NBA executives, but in recent years has become in vogue with several solid NBA players adopting such styles. At times Marcus could play at either the 3 or 4 position, which could be a blessing or a curse in that he could fill either position depending on the situation, but it could also expose him to mismatches in certain situations. He probably will never be a superstar and might not even become a perennial All-Star, but he should be a solid rotation player even if his physical limitations (height and explosiveness) limit his ability to become a major impact player.

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Trey Thompkins

Posted by jstevrtc on June 16th, 2011

Player Name: Trey Thompkins

School: Georgia

Height/Weight: 6’10, 240 lbs.

NBA Position: Power Forward

Projected Draft Range: Late First/Early Second Round

Overview: For the three seasons he was in Athens, Thompkins led the Bulldogs in scoring twice — 17.7 PPG in 2009-10 and 16.4 PPG in 2010-11 — and made his mark as one of the better rebounders in the SEC, finishing fourth in that category the last two years (8.3 and 7.6 RPG, respectively). From his first moment on the UGA campus he was one of the most skilled post scorers in the league. Nobody ever looked at Thompkins and came away wowed by his athleticism, but with nice touch around the basket and the mid-range, and with a surprisingly diverse selection of post moves, Thompkins showed himself to be quite comfortable in his 6’10, 240-pound skin, a quality that a great many kids of similar size at this age don’t acquire until some time later. For his three years, it seemed that Thompkins got a couple of touches on every half-court set; he led his team in touches during his tenure and was near the top in the SEC.

To Stay In the League, Thompkins Needs To Improve His Fitness

Will Translate to the NBA: There are three fundamental things Thompkins does with his back to the basket that we enjoyed watching during his time as a Bulldog. When he gets to the block, he establishes that wide base with his feet that makes it hard for defenders to get around him and it invites his guards to throw it to him (aka, he “presents himself” well in coachspeak). When he gets the ball, he keeps it high and can use both hands to handle the ball or shoot it. Finally, he only waits about a second before getting to the point and starting his move. These are basic building blocks coaches love to see. When not doing work down low, he has a completely reliable jumper to about foul-line range. We don’t expect he’ll be hoisting many threes at the pro level, but he wasn’t totally out of place behind the college arc, picking his spots well and shooting a minimum of 31% in his last two seasons.

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Justin Harper

Posted by rtmsf on June 15th, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Justin Harper

School: Richmond

Height/Weight: 6’9/230 lbs.

NBA Position: Small Forward/Power Forward

Projected Draft Range: Late First/Early Second Round

Overview:  They say that you can’t teach size, but what they really mean when you hear that phrase is a big man’s basic ability to stand near the basket, drop shots into the hole, rebound, and throw up his arms on defense.  The sentiment is that even the most lead-footed of big players is good for a few minutes per game perfoming the aforementioned activities.  What they are not referring to is shooting the ball, especially from distance.  And this is exactly what makes Justin Harper such an intriguing prospect.  At a legitimate 6’9, the Richmond senior is coming off an all-Atlantic 10 season where he proved himself as one of the very best outside shooters in the entire country.  He averaged 17.9 PPG and 6.9 RPG while knocking down 77 threes and hitting them at a nationally-ranked 44.8% on the season (for comparison, Jimmer Fredette hit 39.6% last year).  It’s not that Harper is only an excellent shooting big man, it’s that he’s an excellent shooter.  And therein also lies the quandary for teams looking at the prospect as a future power forward or small forward in the NBA — do you really want to spend a first round pick on a guy his size who prefers hanging around the perimeter?

 

Harper is an Intriguing Prospect For Many Teams

Will Translate to the NBA:  Clearly, Harper has a knack for shooting the ball, with his abilities extending out to the NBA three-point line and beyond.  At a legitimate 6’9 with a smooth release, he’ll have no problem getting his shot off against most defenders.  According to DraftExpress, nearly half of Harper’s shots last season were jumpers, and he nailed both twos (59%) and threes (45%) at a highly efficient rate.  He’s also shown a demonstrated ability to improve, going from a mere 8.6 MPG during his freshman season to becoming one of the best and most decorated big men in Spiders history.  He’s also helped by being a relatively young senior, as he will not turn 22 years old until the coming fall.    

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Kemba Walker

Posted by Brian Goodman on June 14th, 2011

Player Name: Kemba Walker

School: Connecticut

Height/Weight: 6’1/185 lbs.

NBA Position: Point Guard

Projected Draft Range: High First Round

Overview: Despite his short stature, Kemba Walker was incredibly successful as a three-year player for UConn head coach Jim Calhoun. Hailing from the prolific Rice High School in the Bronx, Walker began his college career playing over 25 minutes per game but only started two games as a freshman. America got a taste of what was to come in the 2009 Elite Eight against Missouri, when a 23-point Walker effort helped propel UConn to the Final Four before losing to Michigan State in the national semifinal. From that point on, he cemented himself as the unquestioned leader of the Huskies. While the Huskies missed the NCAA Tournament in his sophomore campaign, Walker continued to improve by using his outstanding quickness to to up his scoring average (14.6 PPG) and refine his three-point shooting (34.2%). Walker’s junior season was a complete revelation from the get-go, as he dropped jaws in Maui with a tournament total of 90 points against Wichita State, Michigan State and Kentucky. Twenty-point games became the norm (a top-five national scorer at 23.2 PPG), but Walker’s collegiate career will of course be remembered for guiding the Huskies through a scorching hot streak at precisely the right time. UConn won five games in five days to capture the Big East Tournament championship, and with the leadership of Walker and freshman Jeremy Lamb, UConn carried that momentum all the way to the NCAA Tournament title.

Kemba's Dream Season Will Soon Result in NBA Riches

Will Translate to the NBA: Explosiveness is the characteristic that will carry Walker to a successful pro career. He’s incredibly quick off the dribble and keeps the ball on a string. Though he stands only 6’1, early on he realized the importance of creating space to gets shots off. As a result, he has grown quite proficient in executing jab steps, crossovers and step-back jumpers. He was incredibly durable as a junior, regularly playing over 35 minutes per contest, a testament to his conditioning and ability to stay out of foul trouble and avoid mistakes. Many also forget that Walker was a very good rebounder for someone his size (5.4 RPG last season), though of all his many skills, this is one that’s most likely to dissolve at the next level.

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RTC NBA Draft Profiles: Jimmer Fredette

Posted by nvr1983 on June 13th, 2011

Over the course of the next month until the NBA Draft on June 23, RTC will be rolling out comprehensive profiles of the 35 collegians we feel have the best chance to hear their names called by David Stern in the first round that night. There won’t be any particular order to the list, but you can scroll back through all the finished profiles by clicking here.

Player Name: Jimmer Fredette

School: BYU

Height/Weight: 6’2/195 lbs.

NBA Position: Point Guard

Projected Draft Range: Mid-First Round

Overview: After spending much of his junior year as a relatively under-the-radar star that only true hoop junkies appreciated, Fredette burst onto the national stage with a series of scintillating performances that turned him into a cult hero  where you could refer to him as just “Jimmer” and everybody would know who you were talking about (ok, maybe his unique name helped with that last part). Fredette’s skills were most evident in a home game against San Diego State where he lit up the Aztecs for 43 points and later in the Mountain West Tournament when he torched New Mexico for 52 points. For all of Fredette’s gifts as a scorer there are major concerns about every other area of his game. The most notable issue is his matador defense that could become a major liability at the next level if he is asked to defend an opposing point guard for any extended period. There are also concerns about his abilities to run a NBA offense against any level of pressure. Because of the stark contrast between certain NBA All-Star level skills (his shooting and scoring abilities) and his D-league skills (defense), Fredette remains one of the most intriguing prospects in the 2011 NBA Draft.

Can Jimmer make the transition to the NBA?

Will Translate to the NBA: Jimmer appears to fit a very specific role in the NBA in our eyes: a scorer who can come off the bench and score in bunches, or, at the very least, stretch opposing defenses to give his team an ability to attack the rim or feed the post. He will probably play as a point guard, but his primary function will be instant offense and he will probably have to rely on another player to act as the primary initiator of the offense to take some of the load off of him. He will probably struggle on defense unless his team can hide him with a zone defense (or something similar), limiting his minutes, but there are plenty of NBA players who are sub-par defenders that remain in the league and play meaningful minutes so it is easy to imagine Fredette staying in the league for a number of years.

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